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Maybe taking a step back, if you reflect back on the journey, what are the top five lessons or take away? Five being... it could be any number, right? So both from one could be on the positive side and one could be on the detractors. What would you...like there’s descending order of revenue...So I would say there are a whole bunch. There are definitely not 5. If anybody tells you that hey these are three things that you take care of and if you take care of these magical things or even better, you know, one of those posts that say, these are the 20 things that you need to take care of and you won't believe the number of slides. I mean that’s not how it works, right? As an entrepreneur, the unfortunate part is that there are a hundred different variables that you need to juggle and each one of them have significant importance. I would say that some of the more important ones... Let's let's let's play it that way... Sure. Some of the more important ones are... look the team that you build around you, it's going be extremely important for you to wait. There is as an entrepreneur, like if you are a sports person then you know, you could be an individual performer the team yes, makes a difference. But at the end of the day, it's your individual performance that's going to matter the most. In business, the team is going to matter the most because if you look at... if you think about it in terms of hey, I want to build some of the best businesses are some of the larger businesses. Yes, there are examples like Instagram where you have less than 20 people that have built an incredible business, but those examples are few and far between and even after that once it started scaling and today there are hundreds of engineers and hundreds of people that are working on it, right? So as you build a business, if you look at the mean, the median and any normal mathematical number, if you want to build a very significant business, at some point in time, you're going to have thousands of employees which basically means that as you... whether it doesn't matter that you're starting with three people right now, you need to think about at some point of time somewhere whether it's five years from now, whether it's 15 years from now, I'm going to have a few thousand employees at the very minimum if I want to build something significant. So all my processes need to keep that in mind in terms of hey, I want to get there right? Got it. Now, the next thing that you want to think about is the team that you build is really important. One of the things that I learned was people keep saying that I want the best team and I want the best team. It's kind of strange, right? Because what does best really mean? Best really means you want the best for the resources that are available to you and the resources that are available to you will keep changing with time. So when you're starting out with very limited capital the best you can get is the best that you can afford with the capital that you have and those people are going to be different from the people that you can get much later. I'm not saying they're going to be worse off or better. They are just going to be different, right? They’re going to be differently skilled and you’ll have to really pay a lot more attention to trying and finding them because every dollar that you spend additionally, is a dollar now that you don't have and is going out of the very, very small pool of capital that you have. So you have to find the people that other people are not finding or not spending the time to find, that are really good. So you spent even more time early on on finding that set of people that you can find that you can convince to work with you, into building and helping build your vision. Then again people keep talking about hey, everybody needs to get in on the vision. The reality is everybody doesn't need to get in on the vision. Some of the people need to get in on the vision and some of them are going to be leaders and some of them are just happy doing the daily work that they're happy doing and that's what they want to do with their life. And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that because every large business or every small business is also going to need people that averagely finish the work that needs to get done. Right,you’re going to have both those combinations. Now one of the things that I found really important in a products company, especially in a products company was that it's not necessarily important to get the smartest guy in the room or smartest girl in the room. It is really important to get someone that is with you longer and enhance I would say loyalty. However, you get it. Whether you just bought it by paying a whole lot more or whether you got it because you created an environment that allowed for it is extremely important in my opinion. And the reason for that is in a products company, if you build incrementally, right, you learn incrementally. So what happens is someone who's been with you for 5 years knows a whole lot more about that industry and about the specific problems that you faced as compared to someone that you bring in fresh. I'm not saying don't bring in fresh people. Good luck to all. As you grow you will keep bringing in fresh talent, but it's really important to have people around that have been around with the business long term because that is true value add, that you bring that unique that can help you build and scale faster. So which is that is important in the context of media.net, I'll give you an example. So we've I spent an incredible amount of time making sure that our attrition rate was one of the lowest in the industry and another learning that I had was you want to keep as many people as possible. Obviously, you can't keep everyone but as they spend more time with you, it becomes even more important for you to keep them long term because they're more valuable to you and your business than they're valuable to somebody else, because logically as long as you give them the right tools, they should be able to add more value to you because they work on your project for a longer period of time than somebody else. So to give you direct numbers, in media.net, I started media.net in 2010. At the time that I left media.net which was December end last year, I had about 1300+ people on the media.net business. And the 1300 people were managed by about 50 people. So everybody that joined us at associate director or higher, there were about 50 people in our lifetime. Sorry, not in our lifetime. At the time that I left, there were about 50 people in my management team that were managing these 1300 people. So obviously each one of these 50 people joined at different times. You know in year one, we might have had let's say 5 or 10 of the 50 people. In year 2, we might have 15 and so on and kept growing. I don't know the exact numbers there. But if I look back and look at those 50 people and you'll find that unique about media.net and I think that that formula works for everyone if you can replicate it... is of the 50 people that were running the 1300 people, of everybody that had reached that level with us, I'd only in the eight years that I ran the business, lost four of them and of the 4 that I lost, I brought back 2 of them. They came back after they had left, joined somebody else and then came to media.net and I spend a lot of time and attention doing that, because I felt it was extremely important to have consistency in the management and the leadership. That truly allowed us to build a product or set up products that allowed us to compete in a world where you're competing, where all the large companies in the world are competing with you. All right. Got it. Um, so I think there are a lot more things that you have to think about as you think about people in terms of who you hire. Hire people that I found that it's not again, it's not necessary that you find the smartest person in the room. It's far more important that you not only find the person that will be with you long term but find people that are extremely hands-on and get stuff done and that's what I have always liked. Now, there's some cultures that do it differently and it works for them. But my formula has been that I like people that are extremely hands-on. So no matter where you are, whether you're a CXO or you're an associate or you’re something in the middle, you need to understand how stuff gets done. You need to understand all the details and you need to be extremely hands-on and that's how I’ve liked it. And I like hiring people that don't need much oversight because the people that do need more oversight, especially... I'm not saying in, because there’ll be departments that need oversight like, you know your back office departments, but those are Associates and Senior Associates. Wherever you hire management, you should hire management that doesn't need oversight because the oversight piece will cost you a lot more in the future. So even if you save a little in the short run, it will cost you more long-term. So you need people that are self-starters, There are self-motivated. This is extremely helpful. You've gone deep into the team, which is a very important aspect that most founders need to spend a lot of time on. Yes. I would say that... there so, there's nothing that I could... so obviously there's so many life lessons that you learn as an entrepreneur over you know, now for me it's been over a little over two decades. I can't obviously fit it all into...